[Iag-list] Lancs PhDs

Simon P J Batterbury simonpjb at unimelb.edu.au
Sun Feb 5 08:04:36 AEDT 2017


Subject: PhDs Lancaster UK





Funded PhDs. [As I understand it, and I am new here, you have to wait until after shortlisting and interview process, to know if you are actually successful since there is a finite amount of money and it depends how many international or domestic students are chosen whether all can be funded at international students fee rates]. See links to details below.





1) Urban Land Grabbing: Linking Land Tenure, Poverty Alleviation and Sustainable Development in Mali

Deadline for Applications: Tue 28 February 2017

Funding Type: Competition Funded PhD Project (Students Worldwide)

Type of Study: PhD

Summary

Supervisors: Benjamin Neimark, Lecturer in Human Geography; Simon Batterbury, Chair in Political Ecology; Camilla Toulmin, Professor of Practice, Lancaster University; International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED).

This is an exciting opportunity for a PhD student to engage in cutting edge research with a supervisory team who have many years of experience in critical development studies and a dynamic political ecology research group. The project provides a unique opportunity to engage in interdisciplinary training (social, spatial and environmental) to address key global sustainability challenges, including urban land-acquisitions, poverty alleviation and peri-urban sustainability. Mali faces far-reaching sustainable development, poverty, governance, and security challenges that are complex and deep-rooted. It is also experiencing growing migratory drift to cities, placing land pressures on peri-urban environments. The peri-urban zone is at the heart of growing concerns of ‘land grabbing’ and intense conflicts between actors who understand land administration procedures and have the means to access formal titles and those without similar knowledge, connections or power. Moreover, given rising land prices and proximity to markets, the peri-urban zone presents an opportunity for investors seeking high-value assets and new income streams. What are the drivers of peri-urban land grabbing, and what are the tensions that exist between established land-holders, investors, and newly-migrated peri-urban dwellers?



Funding Notes

Full studentships (UK/EU tuition fees and stipend (£14,296 2016/17 [tax free])) for UK/EU students for 3.5 years or full studentships (International tuition fees and stipend (£14,296 2016/17 [tax free])) for International students for 3 years.

http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/lec/graduate-school/phd/current-opportunities/index.php?phd_id=320



http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/sci-tech/downloads/phd_320.pdf



political ecology group http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/lec/research/research-areas/political-ecology/







2)Sinking Citizens: A Study of Africa’s Flood-displaced Urban Poor

Deadline for Applications: Tue 28 February 2017

Funding Type: Competition Funded PhD Project (Students Worldwide)

Type of Study: PhD

Apply online

Summary

Supervisors: Dr Manoj Roy (Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University) and Dr Maria Angela Ferrario (School of Computing and Communications, Lancaster University), with additional supervisor(s) from Tanzania and/or Ghana.

Urban climate change risks are often amplified for those who live in informal settlements – places that are undesirable to others thus affordable (these include informal settlements on precarious lands, at high risk from land-slides, sea-level rise, and flooding) and where there is inadequate provision for adaptation. Whilst poverty estimates are notoriously unreliable, predictions consistently show an upward trend of poverty in towns and cities across the Global South, with a jump from 17 to 28% in the past 10 years. In Sub-Saharan Africa the urban share of poverty is already 25%. Predicted to outpace all other regions in the rate of urbanisation, high rates of urban poverty in Africa are already regarded as a major challenge for global poverty reduction goals.

Increased climate variability, especially altered temperature and rainfall patterns, is also predicted to be one of the major factors to aggravate the everyday shocks and stressors facing Africa’s growing poor urban populations. The impacts are both direct and indirect: homes are flooded/ damaged/ destroyed; loss of basic services; livelihoods are disrupted; incomes fall; and health burdens increase, placing additional demand on already overstressed housing facilities and services. For decades, government policy has neglected these people, continues to do so; as a result, households and communities are doing what they possibly can - adjusting their homes and changing their livelihoods and lifestyles on their own.

While scholarship on urban flooding is growing, research to date concerned itself little about the hidden/shadow spaces of suffering, and the full social cost that it entails for poor urban people. Existing studies tend to focus on the actual (spatial) extent of urban floods, and usually concern only those people that keep residing within that space. Population who are displaced involuntarily, short/longer terms, are at best studied partially from those who still live in the affected area. Studies that try to track the displaced are rare. We rarely know how far the affected people move to cope or to acquiescence, how long they stay displaced, who they get support from, what the cumulative direct and indirect (i.e. full) social cost of such displacement is, and the opportunities that the practices developed by affected population may reveal (e.g. what makes people going back to high-risk urban floods – e.g. economic opportunities / family ties; what mechanisms could support a regeneration of extra urban/rural areas currently only seen as ‘shadow’ places of displacement).

Against this backdrop, this PhD project aims to develop an interdisciplinary methodology to map the hidden/shadow space of flood sufferings, to estimate the social cost of urban flooding in informal settlements of Tanzania and/or Ghana, and to harness opportunities from existing practices developed by the affected population. The specific objectives are: (a) understanding the changing nature of urban flooding; (b) capturing the full extent of people’s displacement because of flooding; and (c) contributing to better flood forecast, preparation and adaptive action.

The methodology will incorporate GPS-enabled mobile tracking of flood-related displacement (flood victims self-reporting using open source data bookmarking tools such as SnAPP developed at the School of Computing and Communications, Lancaster University) with respondents’ self-completed research diary on flood impacts on their lives (to measure social costs). It will develop a matrix to associate flood sufferings and source of support for these people to minimise their sufferings with the nature of the flood events. Empirical work will be undertaken in selected slums in Dar es Salaam (Tanzania) and/or Accra (Ghana).



Funding Notes

Full studentships (UK/EU tuition fees and stipend (£14,296 2016/17 [tax free])) for UK/EU students for 3.5 years or full studentships (International tuition fees and stipend (£14,296 2016/17 [tax free])) for International students for 3 years.

http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/lec/graduate-school/phd/current-opportunities/index.php?phd_id=325

political ecology group http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/lec/research/research-areas/political-ecology





3) The evolving role of social media in understanding and shaping knowledge of environmental events

Deadline for Applications: Tue 28 February 2017

Funding Type: Competition Funded PhD Project (Students Worldwide)

Type of Study: PhD

Summary

Supervisors: Dr Alexandra Gormally (Lancaster Environment Centre), Dr Duncan Whyatt (Lancaster Environment Centre) & Emma Bee (British Geological Survey).



Social media has become prolific in our everyday lives. It allows us to communicate and share knowledge globally, in reactive and unprecedented ways. Researchers are becoming increasingly aware of the value these data provide for exploring real-time public responses and understanding of events. Techniques for interrogating these data, spatially, linguistically and ethically, are continuing to develop. In this PhD studentship, you will help to move the agenda forward by learning and advancing data interrogation techniques. More importantly, you will provide greater understanding of the value and meaning this data has in mobilising social movements around specific natural hazard or environmental events. You will work in the Lancaster Environment Centre (LEC) and actively collaborate with colleagues at the British Geological Survey (BGS), who have developed a keen interest in this area. It will be important in this project to ‘think critically’ about the role of social media sources in shaping knowledge, understanding power relations or mobilising community action. Ultimately you will explore the impact these data have on shaping local and global responses.

Funding Notes

Full studentships (UK/EU tuition fees and stipend (£14,296 2016/17 [tax free])) for UK/EU students for 3.5 years or full studentships (International tuition fees and stipend (£14,296 2016/17 [tax free])) for International students for 3 years.

http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/lec/graduate-school/phd/current-opportunities/index.php?phd_id=317

critical geographies  research group  http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/lec/research/research-areas/critical-geographies/









Dr. Simon Batterbury

Jan 2017> Professor of Political Ecology, LEC, Lancaster University, UK, Europe. S.batterbury at lancaster.ac.uk

Principal Fellow | School of Geography | 221 Bouverie St  (rm L2.33) | University of Melbourne, 3010 VIC, Australia. |  simonpjb @ unimelb.edu.au



http://www.simonbatterbury.net

OA and affordable journal list http://tinyurl.com/ze9b4zp

Journal of Political Ecology http://jpe.library.arizona.edu












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