[Iag-list] Final CFP - NZGS/IAG Conference, Auckland 11-14 July - DevNet/Critical Development studies, Indigenous Peoples Knowledges and Rights, Cultural Geography & Environmental Sustainability and Hazards, Risk and Disaster study group sessions

Paul Hodge paul.hodge at newcastle.edu.au
Wed Apr 11 07:47:33 AEST 2018


Hi All,

Final CFP for Joint NZGS/IAG Conference, Auckland 11-14 July. Please see below a summary of 10 session titles and convenors with abstracts and contact details for each at the end of the email.

DUE DATE this Friday 13 April. Please also note that abstracts are strictly 150 words. You also need to submit via conference portal https://nzgsconference2018.org/

Thank you to all session convenors for coming up with these great abstracts!
Take care,
Kelly Dombroski (DevNet), Paul Hodge and the CDSG committee



Paper Sessions
1. New geographies of development: Sophie Webber (University of Sydney) and Fiona Miller (Macquarie University)
2. Youth and migration in the Global South: Andrew Deuchar (University of Melbourne)
3. Critical Geographies of China & Southeast Asia: Sarah Rogers, Yuan Zhenjie, and Vanessa Lamb (University of Melbourne)
4. Forging new knowledge networks for disaster resilience in Monsoon Asia: Lisa Law (James Cook University), Ann Hill (University of Canberra), Katherine Gibson (Western Sydney University)
5. Climate change and new geographies of displacement: Sophie Webber (University of Sydney), Fiona Miller (Macquarie University), Celia McMichael (University of Melbourne), Joseph Rickson (Macquarie University)
6. Critical geographies of climate change, adaptation, and development: Sophie Webber (University of Sydney), Fiona Miller (Macquarie University)
7. Beyond anthropocentrism: the case for species-inclusive development: Yamini Narayanan (Deakin University), Andrew McGregor (Macquarie University), Donna Houston, (Macquarie University)
8. Saltwater Country: Difference and Co-belonging in a New Climatic Regime: Michele Lobo, Michelle Duffy, Kaya Barry, Lauren Rickards, Paul Hodge, Robyn Bartel

Panel
9. Theorising critical development studies: Glenn Banks (Massey University), Kelly Dombroski (University of Canterbury)

Workshop
10. The politics of decoloniality: ethics, methodologies and processes: Yvonne Underhill-Sem (University of Auckland), Paul Hodge (University of Newcastle)

Sessions
Paper Sessions
1. Session title: New geographies of development (DevNet/CDSG)
Convenors: Sophie Webber (University of Sydney) and Fiona Miller (Macquarie University)
Abstract: It has long been a paradox of international development that, despite great financial and intellectual investment in the development enterprise, poverty, inequality and vulnerability persist. New causal processes of uneven development, and new sites and scales of poverty, inequality, and vulnerability are constantly emerging. The changing geography of development is evident in the shift of scales from a focus on the nation-state, to cities or global accords, in the programmatic concern with new problem areas such as environmental and climate changes, or pandemic risks, and in the relocation of sites in need of development intervention to include those in the Global North. This session invites papers that explore, conceptually, empirically and methodologically, the new geographies of international development. Do these new geographies pose challenges to the status quo development apparatus, or simply reinforce its hegemony and negative effects? What opportunities for more hopeful, just and equitable geographies of development exist? We seek papers that analyse new paradigms of development and post-development, or that work at the boundaries of such theory through conversation with other fields.
Please send abstracts of 150 words to Sophie Webber sophie.webber at sydney.edu.au<mailto:sophie.webber at sydney.edu.au> and Fiona Miller Fiona.miller at mq.edu.au<mailto:Fiona.miller at mq.edu.au> by 13 April, 2018 and submit via conference portal https://nzgsconference2018.org/

2. Session title: Youth and migration in the Global South (DevNet/CDSG)
Convenor: Andrew Deuchar, University of Melbourne
Abstract: To a greater extent than has previously been the case, young people are moving around in order to pursue education, employment and other social opportunities. Yet the increased spatial mobility of youth has coincided with the imposition of neoliberal reforms, which have eroded employment opportunities in parts of Africa (Langevang and Gough, 2009), India (Jeffrey, 2010) and Latin America (Crivello, 2011). This has resulted in large numbers of young people - many of whom are migrants - with limited social and economic prospects and without viable pathways to adulthood. Given the sheer number of young migrants across the Global South, scholarly work which analyses and theorises their experiences is critical for theorising national development trajectories more generally.
This session will explore how studies of young migrants and migration might contribute to development theory by addressing questions such as: How might migration itself be conceptualised and what theoretical perspectives enhance these conceptualisations? How do studies of migration contribute to understandings of the linkages between spatial mobility and social mobility? And how do young migrants contend their marginality? Taken together, the papers presented will make an important contribution to development geography by expanding scholarly understandings of youth and migration in the Global South.
Please send abstracts of 150 words to Andrew Deuchar adeuchar at student.unimelb.edu.au<mailto:adeuchar at student.unimelb.edu.au> by 13 April, 2018 and submit via conference portal https://nzgsconference2018.org/

3. Session title: Critical Geographies of China & Southeast Asia (DevNet/CDSG)
Convenors: Sarah Rogers, Yuan Zhenjie, and Vanessa Lamb (University of Melbourne)
Abstract: This session aims to draw together a network of scholars (particularly PhD students and early career researchers) who do critical geography in and about China or Southeast Asia. We are seeking papers that engage with diverse theories including (but not limited to) Marxist political economy, feminist political ecology, governmentality, social practice, hydropolitics, critical development studies, and critical urban theory, and ask questions about how these theories travel or fail to travel to these places.
We welcome a range of topics, methods, and theoretical standpoints, but ask that papers consider some or all of these questions:  How are theoretical frameworks that have primarily developed in Western contexts revised, enriched, or subverted through geographical research in China or Southeast Asia?  What theoretical developments are taking place in China or Southeast Asia and to what extent are these ideas travelling? How is this interplay shaping ways of doing critical geography in China or Southeast Asia?
Please send abstracts of 150 words to Sarah Rogers rogerssm at unimelb.edu.au<mailto:rogerssm at unimelb.edu.au> by 13 April, 2018 and submit via conference portal https://nzgsconference2018.org/

4. Session title: Forging new knowledge networks for disaster resilience in Monsoon Asia (DevNet/CDSG)
Convenors: Lisa Law (James Cook University), Ann Hill (University of Canberra), Katherine Gibson (Western Sydney University)
Abstract: In the spirit of creative conversations and constructive connections, this session brings together scholars working in disaster contexts to forge new knowledge networks in the field of disaster resilience in Monsoon Asia.  We are particularly interested in presentations that foreground place-based and culturally meaningful ways of coping with hazardous events, and how these might strengthen resilience in the face of climate uncertainty in the region.  These coping practices help to extend notions of traditional/local knowledge in disaster research in new directions, but also re-centre disaster resilience on 'epistemologies of the south' (Santos 2014).  The session thus helps illuminate a different way of understanding 'disasters' and 'development' in the region.  Presenters should provide empirical examples which illustrate how this approach can be used to build more sustainable and ecologically responsive local economies and communities.
Please send abstracts of 150 words to Lisa Law (lisa.law at jcu.edu.au<mailto:lisa.law at jcu.edu.au>) by 13 April, 2018 and submit via conference portal https://nzgsconference2018.org/

5. Session title: Climate change and new geographies of displacement (DevNet/CDSG)
Convenors: Sophie Webber (University of Sydney), Celia McMichael (University of Melbourne), Joseph Rickson (Macquarie University) and Fiona Miller (Macquarie University)
Abstract: Both the direct impacts of climate change, as well as responses to climate change in the form of mitigation and adaptation projects, are creating new geographies of displacement - transforming people's relations to place, community and livelihoods. Whilst mobility and displacement have long been central to the uneven development that characterises the Asia Pacific region, climate change is contributing to new and intensified forms of displacement. Forced resettlement typically has adverse consequences for people's well-being. Yet, the relocation of communities is now actively being planned and implemented - as well as resisted - in a number of climate vulnerable places. For geographers, we might ask: how can critical development theories inform understanding of these emerging geographies of displacement and climate change? Do such interventions reflect what Li (2007) refers to as the 'will to improve' inherent to the development project? How do communities and researchers engage with institutions involved in displacement? How are relations to place, community and economy transformed by displacement and the ongoing impacts of climate change? What methods support ethical engagement with, and the co-production of knowledge by, people who experience and anticipate displacement? We invite papers that begin to map the geographies of displacement and, in so doing, reveal the disproportionate burden climate change impacts and responses are having on vulnerable communities.
Please send abstracts of 150 words to Sophie Webber sophie.webber at sydney.edu.au<mailto:sophie.webber at sydney.edu.au> and Fiona Miller Fiona.miller at mq.edu.au<mailto:Fiona.miller at mq.edu.au> by 13 April, 2018 and submit via conference portal https://nzgsconference2018.org/

6. Session title: Critical geographies of climate change, adaptation, and development (DevNet/CDSG)
Convenors: Fiona Miller (Macquarie University), Sophie Webber (University of Sydney)
Abstract: Our neighbouring regions are climate hotspots: they are subject to both the extreme risks of climate change impacts, as well as to extensive experimentation in climate change adaptation and development interventions. Development priorities, funding mechanisms and development actors have reorganised in response to climate change, with some positive but also some troubling consequences. In the small island states of the Pacific, or the low-lying deltas and coastal areas of Southeast Asia, these sites expose the limits of adaptation, stressing the transformational promise of this program of change, as well as inviting insights into how to live on the edges of climate change. These sites, therefore, are essential to understanding new constellations and contradictions of international assistance and climate interventions. As such, this session invites papers that explore the critical and relational geographies of climate change adaptation and development. In particular, we seek papers that make critical, and theoretically informed, contributions to understanding the limits, contradictions, imaginaries, and potentials of climate change adaptation and development programs and policies.
Please send abstracts of 150 words to Sophie Webber sophie.webber at sydney.edu.au<mailto:sophie.webber at sydney.edu.au> and Fiona Miller Fiona.miller at mq.edu.au<mailto:Fiona.miller at mq.edu.au> by 13 April, 2018 and submit via conference portal https://nzgsconference2018.org/

7. Session title: Beyond anthropocentrism: the case for species-inclusive development (DevNet/CDSG)
Convenors: Yamini Narayanan (Deakin University), Andrew McGregor (Macquarie University), Donna Houston, (Macquarie University)
Abstract: Development studies, a multidisciplinary subject area, has remained somewhat removed from the more-than-human debates sweeping environmental social sciences and humanities. Such debates are critical of human exceptionalism, and promote more relational approaches that recognise the agency of non-humans in constituting, or co-producing contemporary socioecologies. Development discourse and practice on the other hand, has been largely complicit in the commodification and financialisation of non-humans as human property and resources to further human development. In this session we focus on non-human animals as important actors within development.  Where development narratives have been attentive to animals, it has largely been to argue for their improved treatment where possible as resources (Kelly 2016), or out of concerns for anthropogenic environmental change caused by animal agriculture (Weis 2013). An 'Animals and Development' meta-narrative is yet to be articulated in international development theory or practice.
This panel aims to provoke expanded justice-oriented conceptions of inclusive development to species-inclusive, or multi-species inclusive development. It introduces animals into development discourse as social actors in multispecies communities, rather than as natural resources for human communities. The panel considers the provocations to the property status of animals, advanced by the burgeoning animal rights civil protection movement worldwide. It aims to expand the ambit of social justice in development, to 'sociozoologic justice' (Narayanan 2016) where the harms from exploitation are not privileged as uniquely human traumas, but recognised as shared species vulnerabilities. Dismantling the human/animal binary fundamentally requires recognition of humans also as species (Blue 2015).  Though a species-inclusive approach we seek to deepen and broaden understandings of how development transforms multi-species communities, and identify more caring and just approaches.
This panel invites papers that consider the diverse ways in which more-than-human development studies might be enacted: through incorporating an explicit focus on non-humans into development processes; by focusing upon more-than-human relations and assemblages as foundations of development; and through creative place-based approaches to development practice whereby human and non-human agencies are mobilised in pursuit of desirable ends. It invites papers that considers non-human animals and development in areas including and not limited to:

  1.  Biopolitics, technical assistance, and the industrialisation of animal agriculture
  2.  Urbanisation and biodiversity
  3.  Diverse human-animal relations - animals in culture/societies/religion/tradition
  4.  Animals as agents of development / animals as aid / aid for animals
  5.  Sexual politics of meat / milk - gendered violence in animal farming
  6.  Animals, climate change and the Anthropocene
  7.  Human and animal rights within development
  8.  Meatification and the commodification of lively bodies
  9.  Multi-species justice and development
  10. Hunger, poverty, animals and development
  11. Animals within conservation and ecosystem services projects
  12. Practicing species-inclusive development
Please send abstracts of 150 words to Yamini Narayanan y.narayanan at deakin.edu.au<mailto:y.narayanan at deakin.edu.au> Andrew McGregor andrew.mcgregor at mq.edu.au<mailto:andrew.mcgregor at mq.edu.au> and Donna Houston donna.houston at mq.edu.au<mailto:donna.houston at mq.edu.au> by 13 April, 2018 and submit via conference portal https://nzgsconference2018.org/

8. Session Title: Saltwater Country: Difference and Co-belonging in a New Climatic Regime

Keywords: difference, elements, more-than-human encounters, race, belonging,

(Sponsored by the Cultural Geography Study Group, Critical Development Studies Group and Environmental Sustainability-Hazards Risks Disasters Study Group, Institute of Australian Geographers)

Convenors: Michele Lobo, Michelle Duffy, Kaya Barry, Lauren Rickards, Paul Hodge, Robyn Bartel

We invite papers that highlight encounters with seas, oceans, rocky coastlines, tidal zones, islands, mangrove environments, reefs, and species that inhabit saltwater country (land, water, air) in a 'New Climatic Regime' (Latour, 2017). This session follows on from the successful IAG supported workshop, Oceanic Responsibilities and Co-belonging (Feb 2018) that engaged stakeholders in explorations of collaborative and creative responses to climate change. Papers could explore an analysis of climate change policies in relation to risk and security. It might include practices of deep-sea mining, offshore oil/gas production, fishing or immersive bodily practices of diving and aquabatics. It could be about multispecies encounters or rangers working on coastal country (land/sea). It may focus on travelling cyclones, festivals that celebrate the elements or nonhuman forces of saltwater country that might nourish the racialized and dehumanised. We welcome theoretical as well as empirical papers that may bridge divides within and across art, science and the humanities. We invite 'minor' western, non-western and Indigenous philosophies of life/non-life that can strengthen current explorations of resilience and sustainability. By centering saltwater country (land, water and air) we are inspired by van Dooren and Rose's (2016) call for 'Lively Ethographies' that are awake to difference in human and more-than-human worlds.

Please submit abstracts of 150 words to Michele Lobo Michele.Lobo at deakin.edu.au<mailto:Michele.Lobo at deakin.edu.au>  and Michelle Duffy Michelle.Duffy at newcastle.edu.au<mailto:Michelle.Duffy at newcastle.edu.au>  by 9 April 2018 and upload it on the conference website https://nzgsconference2018.org/

Panel
8. Panel session title: Theorising critical development studies (DevNet/CDSG)
Conveyors: Glenn Banks (Massey University), Kelly Dombroski (University of Canterbury)
Abstract: Faced with the reality of intractable poverty-in both the Majority and Minority worlds-and heterogeneous manifestations of development's promise, theoretical interventions (explanations, enactments, performances) continue to proliferate. In this session, panellists are invited to take a particular development problem e.g managing the environment, strengthening social protection, ensuing social inclusion, promoting accountable governance, enhancing civil society etc., and think through how we might theorise the problem in new ways that challenge dominant neoliberal development discourses while offering novel pathways to improved development futures. Eight nominated presenters will be asked to talk for 5 minutes on their theoretical intervention leaving plenty of time for Q&A time following the short panel presentations.

Workshop
Session sponsor: Critical development studies group/DevNet/
9. Workshop session title: The politics of decoloniality: ethics, methodologies and processes (DevNet/CDSG & Indigenous Peoples Knowledges and Right study group)
Facilitators: Yvonne Underhill-Sem (University of Auckland), Paul Hodge (University of Newcastle)
Abstract:
Purpose of the workshop sessions:
To begin a collaborative long-term agenda to discern a 'politics of decoloniality' in our collective work. The two workshop sessions aim to build on the important work already under way in Oceania to conceive of, and practice, explicit political interventions that mobilise decolonial thought and practice in ways within and beyond the university.

The politics of decoloniality: ethics, methodologies and processes I - sharing stories:
Researchers working in development geography, critical development studies, Indigenous studies and Pacific studies are coming under increased pressure to 'speed up' research endeavours, including ethics processes, fieldwork and academic outputs. These pressures often work against the kinds of relationship building, methodological agility and collaborative reflection essential for ethical intercultural research. In this first of two workshop sessions on the 'politics of decoloniality', participants are invited to share encounters, experiences and moments in their work that reveal the need to decolonise ideas and practices. We see this collective sharing as a necessary first step to discern a politics of decoloniality where scholarly work might be used to (i) push against colonial practices and processes underpinning the neoliberal university, (ii) take an explicit political step beyond the academy and, (iii) articulate a Charter on decoloniality. What these critical interventions might look, feel and sound like will be a key intention of the workshop sessions. Insights from this session I will be documented and used to inform collaborative work in session II.

The politics of decoloniality: ethics, methodologies and processes II - tangible action:
Negotiating a 'politics of decoloniality' is more than a theoretical endeavour. Many scholars are situated at the intersections of material insufficiences, everyday discrimination and growing intolerance where the 'so what' of our conceptual exercises invite and even demand meaningful and tangible acton. In this session we work towards a longer-term political agenda which specifies places and sites of action and practices of a politics of decoloniality in our research methods, our pedagogies and in our engagements within our institutions and beyond.  In session II move the discussion forward by focussing on specific spaces (such as for instance ethics processes), specific practices (such as for instance the evaluation of research methodologies in grant writing and publishing) and specific concepts (such as for instance participation, intersectionality and indigeneity).


DR PAUL HODGE
Lecturer in Development Studies, Geography & Environmental Studies
School of Environmental and Life Sciences

I acknowledge the Aboriginal custodians of the land in the region where I live and work, the Awabakal and Worimi peoples. I acknowledge the Elders, past, present and future, and Country itself.

Co-convenor Critical Development Study Group (IAG)
Profile: http://www.newcastle.edu.au/profile/paul-hodge
T: +61 2 4921 5092 (Room SR296 Geography Wing, Social Science Building)
E: paul.hodge at newcastle.edu.au<mailto:paul.hodge at newcastle.edu.au>

The University of Newcastle (UoN)
University Drive
Callaghan NSW 2308
Australia
CRICOS Provider 00109J

-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: <https://lists.flinders.edu.au/pipermail/iag-list/attachments/20180410/af531023/attachment.html>


More information about the Iag-list mailing list