[Iag-list] Indigenous Peoples' Knowledges and Rights Study Group Sponsored/ Co-sponsored Sessions at the IAG 2019

Sandy Potter sandra.potter at anu.edu.au
Thu Jan 31 07:37:50 AEDT 2019


Dear IAG List members,
As you are thoroughly aware, the call for abstracts for papers and/or presentations for the Institute of Australian Geographers Conference 2019 at Wrest Point in Hobart have now opened!

We are excited that the study group is sponsoring / co-sponsoring three sessions in this conference as well as keynote speaker Greg Lehman (University of Melbourne). The session are:

  1.  Justice, Indigeneity and the Settler-Colonial City: Emergence, Divergence and Convergence (Convened by Naama Blatman-Thomas, Francis Markham and Maeve Powell) (Co-sponsored with the Urban Geography study group)
  2.  Decolonising the University: Theory and Praxis (Convened by Michele Lobo and Kaya Barry)
  3.  Developments in Geographies by, for and on behalf of Indigenous peoples (Convened by Sandra Potter and Warrick Fort)
  4.  Indigenous peoples’ knowledges and rights: emerging, diverging and converging research methods and practices (Convened by Sandra Potter and Warrick Fort)
You can find abstracts for these sessions at the end of this email, as well as at the link here: https://cdesign.eventsair.com/2019-iag/abstracts

We look forward to seeing your abstracts!

Best wishes,

Sandy Potter and Warrick Fort



Abstracts
1. Justice, Indigeneity and the Settler-Colonial City: Emergence, Divergence and Convergence (Convened by Naama Blatman-Thomas, Francis Markham and Maeve Powell) (Co-sponsored with the Urban Geography study group)
In this joint session for the Indigenous Peoples Knowledges and Rights and Urban Geography study groups we aim to further contemporary engagements with Indigenous peoples and the settler-colonial city. For too long has urban geography theorised capitalism without colonialism, property without Country, urban politics without Sovereignty and difference without Indigeneity. The effort to end the silence about settler colonialism in urban studies and to centre Indigenous perspectives within the field is well underway. The session is premised on the gambit that understanding the relation between settler colonialism and the urban is a necessary precondition for justice in the settler-colonial city. We aim to further this research agenda, questioning and rethinking the empirical, conceptual and methodological underpinnings of urban geography.
The session seeks contributions that are situated within settler colonial contexts and/or use a settler colonial lens to contribute to contemporary debates around facets of Indigeneity in urban landscapes. Topics may include, but are not limited to:

  *   Social segregation, desegregation and encounter;
  *   Race, racialisation and whiteness in cities;
  *   Commons and prefigurative urban arrangements;
  *   Indigenous/non-Indigenous alliances;
  *   Decolonisation, Indigenisation and Indigenous visibility;
  *   Sovereignty, self-determination, rights, and urban politics;
  *   Indigenous people’s knowledge and cities;
  *   Urban infrastructures (e.g. public transport, housing, green spaces);
  *   Carceral logics, surveillance and control;
  *   Racial political economy, ground-rent and land rights;
  *   Migration, motion and im/mobilities;
  *   Urban Indigenous methodologies
We hope to solicit presenters in this session to submit full papers for a publication in an edited book or a special issue in a leading urban studies journal.
 2. Decolonising the University: Theory and Praxis (Convened by Michele Lobo and Kaya Barry)
‘Once upon a time scholars assumed that if you ‘come’ from Latin America you have to ‘talk about’ Latin America; that in such a case you have to be a token of your culture. Such expectation will not arise if the author ‘comes’ from Germany, France, England or the US’
(Walter D Mignolo, 2009)
In this session we ask: If decolonisation is about proliferating planetary imaginaries of being and becoming otherwise, what are the practices we must engage in to decolonise the university. Such a question is crucial when neoliberal pressures and the reproduction of academic practices of privilege have the unintended effect of keeping racial hierarchies intact.  While focusing on the university might render us vulnerable, it is this site of vulnerability that has the capacity to mutate ‘decolonisation’ as more than another academic buzzword. Themes are unlimited but could include:

  *   Struggle and activism –e.g. @Rhodes must fall, #WeAreTheUniversity, https://www.smh.com.au/education/staff-left-betrayed-as-university-reveals-ramsay-centre-deal-20181217-p50msp.html
  *   Academic practices, the mundane and everyday decolonisation
  *   Geography, Geographers and Decolonisation in Australia
  *   Academic freedom and the politics of knowledge production
  *   Southern theory and global knowledge hierarchies
 Please submit your abstract (150 words) online via the conference website  https://cdesign.eventsair.com/2019-iag/abstracts and email the session convenors michele.lobo at deakin.edu.au<mailto:michele.lobo at deakin.edu.au> and  Kaya Barry k.barry at griffith.edu.au<mailto:k.barry at griffith.edu.au> with a copy. The deadline for submission of abstracts is 28 February 2019.

3. Developments in Geographies by, for and on behalf of Indigenous peoples(Convened by Sandra Potter and Warrick Fort)
This general session, sponsored by the Indigenous Peoples' Knowledges and Rights Study Group, is focused on developments in geographies by, for and on behalf of Indigenous peoples within Australia and around the globe. We are particularly interested in how spaces and narratives of convergence, emergence and divergence have been and are being navigated to support Indigenous peoples, Country, knowledges and rights.

4. Indigenous peoples’ knowledges and rights: emerging, diverging and converging research methods and practices (Convened by Sandra Potter and Warrick Fort)
This session, sponsored by the Indigenous Peoples' Knowledges and Rights Study Group, is focused on emerging, diverging and converging research methods and practices which are inspired by or pay respect to Indigenous peoples’ knowledges and rights. We are particularly interested in hearing from postgraduate students and others who are co-producing knowledges with Indigenous peoples in Australia and around the globe. Methods could focus on combining epistemologies, practicing ethical research in Indigenous contexts, and any other such developments in the field.


-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: <https://lists.flinders.edu.au/pipermail/iag-list/attachments/20190130/6a42a2ba/attachment-0001.html>


More information about the Iag-list mailing list