​Message from the New Zealand Centre for Human-Animal Studies
 
Kia ora koutou katoa / Hi everyone.
 
We are very excited to announce the following:
 
From January 2018, the University of Canterbury will be offering a PhD in Human-Animal Studies. This is the first such degree offered in the Southern Hemisphere, and one of only three or four throughout the world.
 
http://www.nzchas.canterbury.ac.nz/courses/phdhuan.shtml
 
Students undertaking the PhD in Human-Animal Studies (PhD HUAN) at UC will work with supervisors drawn from our pool of over a dozen academic staff working in many different areas, and will be part of the lively and inclusive research culture of the New Zealand Centre for Human-Animal Studies.
 
Areas for supervision include, but are not limited, to the following:
 
  • Associate Professor Philip Armstrong: animals in Aotearoa New Zealand and the Pacific; animals in literature; animals in history, especially the Renaissance and the Nineteenth Century; sheep in culture and history; whales and dolphins in culture and history; animals and environmental discourse.
  • Associate Professor Jane Buckingham: animals in South Asian History; elephants and elephantology.
  • Dr Douglas Campbell: animals, philosophy and environmentalism; extinction and de-extinction.
  • Nikki Evans: animals in the context of human services and social work; human-animal relationships in the aftermath of earthquakes; animal-assisted therapy; the link between animal abuse and human violence; animals and children.
  • Associate Professor Amy Fletcher: extinction and de-extinction; animals and public understandings of science and technology; animals and futurology; animals and environmental discourse.
  • Dr Rosie Ibbotson: animals in the visual arts; museology and display of human-animal relations; extinction and de-extinction.
  • Dr Piers Locke: multispecies ethnography; elephants and elephantology; interspecies care; animals and environmental discourse; humanism and post-humanism.
  • Dr Alison Loveridge: animal welfare and advocacy; animals in agriculture and food production; animals in New Zealand; animals and rural life; animals and children.
  • Dr Carolyn Mason: animals and ethics; bioethics.
  • Professor Henrietta Mondry: dogs in culture and history; animals in Russian culture and history; animals in Slavic cultures; companion species; animals in literature; de-extinction.
  • Dr Patrick O’Sullivan: animals in Ancient Greek culture and society; animals in classical literature and drama.
  • Associate Professor Annie Potts: animals in Aotearoa New Zealand and the Pacific; animals in art; human-animal relations and gender; representations of animals in horror and science fiction; chickens in culture and history; possums in culture and history; animals and emergencies; intersectionality.
  • Dr Michael-John Turp: animals and ethics; animals in Early Modern philosophy.
 
To enquire about the PHD (HUAN), contact any of the following:
 
 
With profound thanks for the support we received from our friends and colleagues in AASA for this initiative,
 
A/Prof Annie Potts BSc, PhD
Cultural Studies Programme Coordinator www.cult.canterbury.ac.nz Co-Director, New Zealand Centre for Human-Animal Studies: www.nzchas.canterbury.ac.nz Equity and Diversity Rep, College of Arts University of Canterbury | P.B. 4800 | Christchurch Aotearoa New Zealand.
 
 

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